704 N. Wells St., CHICAGO, IL 60654 USA, Tel: 312.664.3406 email



Opening reception: FRIDAY, September 11, 2015, 5-8pm

Howard Hersh, "Two Means to an End"

Over the course of an artist's working life, it's not unusual for one body of work to inform another.  I currently find myself in a less familiar situation: working on two distinctly different bodies of work that address the same issues from opposing directions. 

    "Dispositions of Structure" (encaustic on panel) are paintings about structure: the fabric of the universe as we know it, from invisible forms of energy pulsing through every atom to visible natural phenomena. And beyond physical structures, these paintings tackle the societal, political, and intellectual structures we all must navigate.

    "Skin Deep" (acrylic on birch and basswood) developed from an inquiry into the nature of painting itself. Specifically, I am questioning the notion that paintings exist as pictures of something -- illusions -- while sculptures exist on their own, as objects.   Because I love making things as well as paintings, I wanted to deconstruct painting and push this work closer to "object-hood." The basswood wall structures of "Skin Deep” exert themselves as objects, encapsulating as well as supporting the paintings.

      Simply put, "Two Means to an End" are paintings about structure and structures about painting.

Howard Hersh, "Skin Deep", acrylic on wood, 40x40x4

Also opening FRIDAY, September 11, 5-8pm:

Sarah Rehmer, "Upheavals and Outbursts".

In my current works with paper “upheavals and outbursts,” I continue to explore the idea of misplaced memories while also considering what happens to these memories and feelings we purposely bury. I am questioning what happens when our buried thoughts and emotions start rising to the surface and breaking through.

Sarah Rehmer, positive/negative stories #2, 2015, 8" x 10" x 4"
encaustic and paper on panel

Gallery Spotlight: Encaustic Painting at Addington Gallery

Excerpted from Chicago Art News

I asked Dan Addington if I could write about his gallery in my own words based on a number of conversations we’ve had. Addington features a number of artists who who explore a unique relationship between image and process oriented painting, including the medium of encaustic. It’s fun talking to Dan about encaustic art because he’s passionate about the medium and the way each artist uses it differently.

Let's step back and start with the basics of encaustic painting. Point one, it’s ancient, dating back to the 4th century BC.

And point two: painting with wax is very hard to do, it’s hard to control, and you have to work fast because wax goes from molten-lava-hot to dried candle wax in about 10 seconds. And like other mediums in which it’s difficult to master the basics, when a medium like this grows in popularity, a lot of the practitioners get lost in the technique, they become “Encaustic Painters” rather than artists who have to be working with Encaustic materials. And with this popularity, classes follow, which evolve into academic studies and before you know it…. there are a whole lot of rules.

Dan Addington is, himself, an encaustic painter – and he’s been doing it a long time, before it got trendy. In turn, he’s a fan of Howard Hersh, Mark Perlman and others who have been doing it even longer than him, before the schools and the hobbyists got their hands on it. Before the rules were written. So Addington’s aesthetic, and Encaustic posse could possibly be defined in that way: pre convention.

Addington builds his paintings up layer by layer, drawing on and gouging into the surface, adding oil paint, tar, fabric and other odd materials into the mix, which gives the work a very textural feel.

Now, Howard Hersh, who was featured in a recent exhibit and is represented by the gallery, is also pre-rules, yet he has a completely different approach, and balances the geometric with the inherent chaos of encaustic.

So how to tell the Encaustic painters from the artists who work with wax? Addington gravitates to work that has a conceptual level to it, artists who are going for a specific idea, and not just expressing their feelings through random splashes of color.

As Addington pointed out, “Encaustic has a visual archaeology that exists in each piece. Because you can see the translucent layers, it opens the door to the process. With much painting, the top surface is often the only surface the viewer can access. With encaustic, you can dig down through the layers and see the history…”




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    Representing contemporary American and International artists


    Addington Gallery is located in the historic River North Gallery District in Chicago.
    Open 11:00 - 6:00 Tuesday through Saturday, and by appointment
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    Addington Gallery features artists who work in a wide range of contemporary styles, subjects, and mediums. The gallery also offers a full range of services, including installation, painting restoration and conservation, framing consultation, and corporate curating.